Gap Peak

 Posted by on September 26, 2003  Kananaskis Provincial Park  4 Responses »
Sep 262003
 

Friday September 26th 2003

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My original objective, Banded Peak, is a long day. I was laying in bed, healing/sleeping when it occurred to me that although I had missed my opportunity for Banded Peak, at roughly 10:30 AM there was still enough time to get to a scramble I had completely forgot about, Gap Peak.

With that realization I bolted from the sack, suddenly energized with the realization that I could be on a summit near the Bow Corridor, on a beautiful fall day.

That’s an incredible enticement to me!

Off to the Mountain

After the preparations and drive I found myself under way, going up, at 1:00 PM. On the way at last I was surprised by the familiarity of it all. I thought summer was over but on a day like today, a beautiful fall day, it seems that all of the best is saved for the last. The fall colors and temperature were perfect.

In such pleasant conditions, I reflected on my growing belief that difficult exercise, alone in such demanding yet awesome settings  does not grow strength but power.

The distinction being that power unlike strength garners more personal responsibly. You have to harness it like a flame, or it’ll burn ya!

It had been a long time and I was grateful to be on the mountain again, in excellent settings and conditions. I was going up slope, had great views, could smell the forest and fresh air and was on a great peak.

This little Bow Corridor peak was more demanding than I thought it would be. Unlike it’s neighbors Exshaw Mountain and Doorjamb Mountain, this one demands a few more hours of exertion.

The Upper Mountain

After about an hour you exit the trees onto a pleasant slope of firm scree.

Up the scree is a cliff that must be circumnavigated. There’s a trail on the right (east) side. After that is a steep slope with trees. The slope tends back to the left after rounding the base of the cliff. Lo and behold you find yourself at another obstacle. A short amount of scrambling brings you to another cliff.

This time you have to go on the other side of the cliff. I’m not bluffing! Go to the left side (west) of it. After that more slopes. Argggg! Just keep on plodding.

Once on the narrow summit ridge you can finally see the summit proper. Uh…., oops…, the false summit.

This last part is fun, but be cautious. Although it’s not terribly exposed, the wind can be gusty in this region of the Canadian Rockies. You have to walk with deliberate steps, anticipate each foot placement and generally crouch to maintain a low center of mass and therefore be less bifurcating.

 

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I've replaced the Crow. This sure beats eating Crow.

I’ve replaced the Crow. This sure beats eating Crow.

Small Movie

Small Movie

The ridge is a good scramble but please be cautious as even a small fall can have lethal consequences. At one point my concentration lapsed for just a split second and I stepped on a rock that rolled under foot at an exposed section.

It was a freak rock!

I reacted perfectly but it just goes to show how with a long ridge like this, with gusty wind, care and attention are tantamount to survival unscathed. After a 25 minute break for food, water and panoramas on the summit, the increasingly hostile gusts forced me to abandon my hard fought throne.

The Obsticle

The final obstacle on the way down.
This Gendarme is easy to climb from this side but the difficulty is on the way down the other side.

The forest near the bottom The light is fading

The forest near the bottom, The light is fading.

Small Movie

Small Movie (thumbnail too 😉 )

The down climb was more difficult, as always, but the knowledge that I had succeeded helped.
I was buoyed!

Looking back to the Canadian Rockies at sunset on the way home.

 

gap_pano

Gap Peak Panorama

The poetical impression of any object is that uneasy, exquisite sense of beauty or power that cannot be contained within itself; that is impatient of all limit; that (as flame bends to flame) strives to link itself to some other image of kindred beauty or grandeur; to enshrine itself, as it were, in the highest forms of fancy, and to relieve the aching sense of pleasure by expressing it in the boldest manner.

William Hazlitt
1778-1830, British Essayist

Gap Peak Gallery

 

Cascade Mountain

 Posted by on July 20, 2001  Banff National Park  7 Responses »
Jul 202001
 

Cascade Mountain – Canadian Rockies

Ann on the summit of Cascade Mountain

Hey Ann you’re on the summit of Cascade Mountain!

If you’re wondering why the content of this page keeps changing, my editor killed the page and I had to resurrect an older version from a backup. Same thing with my Mount Cory page. It’s very strange no? Hey Ann you were on that “hike” too; have you been sharpening your hacking skills that the computer faculty/department is no doubt and yes very obviously teaching you? (tutelagening)

The first attempt I made on this peak failed. My partner hiking bud for the day Officer Rob Davidson of the Calgary Police Service had a knee injury that we thought would be OK. About half way up the mountain, the knee was hurting.

I told him I had no problem going back down; “Cascade isn’t going any where” I said. Rob is a determined individual, but when pain talks we get lame walks. It just isn’t worth a chronic injury to push that hard.

July 20/2001

The next attempt was with “Hey Ann”, eight days after we summited Mount Cory. About half way up I experienced some dizziness and a heart palpitation. This was my first adrenalin rush of the season, and not the last.

I sat down, drank some fluids, then continued to the summit. The rush was spawned by a look over a sharp crest. In lousy shape, I was pushing hard and so the adrenalin was more than my straining heart could take. It lost it’s rhythm and blood flow to my brain was compromised for a moment. Some people also talk of tunnel vision, this is a sign of pushing too hard.

As for the Mountain;

…my whole life, every time I passed through Banff, I always looked up at the pyramid of Cascade Mountain with awe. Now on the summit, it was a special moment in a special place (to me). As for this Hey Ann Chick, she unjustly blew it off as “just a hike”. 😐

Cloud over Cascade Mountai

Cloud over Cascade Mountain

Hey Ann

When we got back to my dear Ann’s truck, she mumbled something about Superman. I was very flattered, but on that day it was obviously true. One can always aspire to great heights, can’t one? I must fly! If you need lessons just let me know, no problemo

Cascade is a wonderful mountain, the object of many an artist. I’ve noticed however that none have captured the mountain from the Bow Valley. They all seem to derive their perspective from each other. I’m going to set my tripod just below the falls some morning, looking up at the looming mountain from an inferior oblique perspective, cowering laughing under it’s massive girth. And then I will go conquer it again, as fast as I can.

Sunshine is delicious, rain is refreshing, wind braces us up, snow is exhilarating; there is really no such thing as bad weather, only different kinds of good weather.

John Ruskin
8 February 1819 – 20 January 1900, the leading English art critic of the Victorian era

Hey man where did you go?
Thought I, but I guess
I don’t know you
Gave you my heart
You looked to take it apart
Hey man what did you do?
Walked away we weren’t through
Last time was a fake shaken head
Now I think it must be said

Hey man
Can’t be everybody’s friend
Ain’t no way man
To be everybody’s friend

Jane’s Addiction
“Everybody’s Friend”

Stoney Squaw Mountain

 Posted by on October 17, 2001  Banff National Park  1 Response »
Oct 172001
 

This little mountain was all I wanted to conquer on my last climb of my original 50. I thought It might be nice to take a break from it and just enjoy the view…..

9:44 Parking lot of Mt. Norquay. Go’in to Stoney Squaw Mountain. I’m on vacation from my vocation, it’s
How awe ya FIVE OOOHHH…!

Tim:
Had a depressing time lately, a real roller coaster.
Heart: I know a little song, if you like I can sing it for you, it’s called Daisy!….
Tim:
…….Yes Pal………… I’d like to hear it…
please sing it for me……

Heart: THUMP…THUMP…
Heart: BEAT…THUMP…THUMP
Heart: Daisy,
Daisy,.. give me your answer do… I’m half crazy, all for
the love of you.It won’t be a
stylish marriage, I can’t afford a carriage….But woshe
drog golf…….drooo..

 

Hummm! When I first found this website I thought.., someone’s thinking like me! Now after closer examination I will confess that although it’s compelling, I reserve judgment as to whether I endorse their ideas or not.

Hummm! When I first found this website I thought.., someone’s thinking like me! Now after closer examination I will confess that although it’s compelling, I reserve judgment as to whether I endorse their ideas or not.

11:50 Back at my V.W. Rabbit a.k.a. “Death Car”.

Well that went off with out a hitch. Par for the course!

5:41 Back in Caly, just got out of the shower, it all seems so familiar.

11:47 PM Oct18/2001: I remember the looking across at Cascade Mountain, one of the most beautiful mountains I’d ever seen. It was quiet, calm, and windless; only the murmur of a distant train could be heard.

It felt like the best Christmas ever

It felt like the best Christmas ever

I was with Stoney Squaw Mountain, was all alone, and central to the valley and the world as a whole.

Looking down the northeast face of Stoney Squaw and across at Cascade Mountain will be etched in my mind forever. Goodbye until next
summer my mountain.

I love you.

The End

There are you searching for me, friend? Look! Here am I right within you. Not in temple, nor in mosque, not in Kaaba nor Kailas, but here right within you am I.

Kabir
Hindu Philosopher 1400-1499,

The death of a dear friend, wife, brother, lover, which seemed nothing but privation, somewhat later assumes the aspect of a guide or genius; for it commonly operates revolutions in our way of life, terminates an epoch of infancy or of youth which was waiting to be closed, breaks up a wonted occupation, or a household, or style of living, and allows the formation of new ones more friendly to the growth of character.

Ralph Waldo Emerson
1803-1882, American Poet, Essayist

Gallery